Managing Supervised Visitation During Parenting Time

Dealing with a divorce when children are involved can be highly stressful and include numerous decisions that need to be defined and made. One of those decisions is the visitation schedule between both parents and their children. When coming up with visitation schedules, sometimes one parent may need to have supervised visitation time with their children. The court usually orders this because the parent in question has a history with domestic violence, substance abuse or improper sexual behaviors. The court wants children to have contact with both parents, if possible. However, if the one of the parents is declared to be a high-risk parent when left alone with the child, then supervised visitation is required. With supervised visitation, the child can still visit their parent, while still staying safe.

In order to properly draft up a parenting plan that includes supervised visitation, certain details must be included. Rules for the supervision as to what is allowed and what is not acceptable, if the supervisor is a paid supervisor or a trusted third party, such as a grandparent must be determined. Also, if back-up supervisors can be obtained, and if the supervision can expire, be terminated or expanded are all key points to mention in your parenting plan. Make sure you are very specific and as detailed as possible. This will become key and a crucial point for argument and defense once a visitation schedule is drafted.

This is highly recommended because if any problems arise with the supervised visitation, the court is going to look back on this parenting plan to see if the certain rules have been violated. The court will also look back on this parenting plan if you ex-spouse is requesting to either extend the time with the child or terminate the need for supervision. The best plan of action in creating a well-documented parenting plan is to speak with an experienced visitation lawyer who can make sure all these key points are addressed. Once the parenting plan is fully established, then both you and your ex-spouse and keep yourselves, as well as your children, well protected moving forward.

See also  Equal Rights for Fathers Regarding Child Visitation